Health Professionals Who May Refer You To A Physical Therapist Who Specializes In Pelvic Floor Work

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Health Professionals Who May Refer You To A Physical Therapist Who Specializes In Pelvic Floor Work

3 April 2018
 Categories: , Blog


When your pelvic floor is weak, you're apt to suffer from a wide range of unpleasant symptoms, many of which can leave you feeling embarrassed and uncomfortable, as well as experiencing a decline in your overall quality of life. The average person likely doesn't know enough about his or her anatomy to know when to book an assessment with a physical therapist who specializes in pelvic floor work. Luckily, there are many medical professionals who can identify that your pelvic floor may be weak, and thus refer you to a physical therapist for help. Here are three health professionals who may encourage you to set up such an appointment.

Urologist

One of the common side effects of having a weak pelvic floor is bladder incontinence. You may find that you release a small amount of urine into your underwear unexpectedly on a regular basis, which can embarrass you — especially if you're at work or in public. Although there are some home care techniques that you can try for bladder incontinence, you'll want to seek the care of a urologist. He or she may deem that your pelvic floor is contributing to your incontinence and refer you to a physical therapist for help.

Sex Therapist

A pelvic floor that lacks strength can make sexual activity uncomfortable or downright painful. You may be embarrassed and unsure about this pain, and try to limit sexual contact to keep the pain at bay. This scenario can lead to a strain in your relationship, and you may take the plunge to visit a sex or relationship therapist for help. Inevitably, the discomfort that you experience during sexual activities will come up during your counseling session, which can often prompt a knowledgeable sex therapist to recommend that you see a physical therapist.

Obstetrician

If you're expecting a child and are visiting an obstetrician at regular intervals, he or she will likely be concerned about the strength of your pelvic floor region. Strength in this part of your body can make it easier for you to carry your child without complications, while also making it easier to give birth. Conversely, a weakness in this area can add challenges when you're in labor. An obstetrician may assess this part of your body before referring you to a pelvic floor physical therapist. He or she can give you an exercise regimen that you can use to add strength before it's time to give birth to your child.

Contact a medical center like Proactive Pelvic Health Centre for additional information.